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Chords on the Flute (multiphonics)

Can be played only softly. In the octave above middle C:
You may have to experiment with breath pressure in each case. (There are other multiphonics, but they don't all work on all flutes.)

High notes

The "official" highest note of a standard flute is the C 3 octaves above middle C (called "4th octave C" if counting from where the flute starts, "7th octave C" on the piano), but I sometimes get asked how to finger notes above it. Here is a quick reference, although I do not recommend these notes as they can be noisy.
NoteLeft handRight hand
C#:A, G#F
D:thumb, GF, E, C
D#:All down to Eb (i.e. thumb, B, A, G, G#, F, E, D, Eb)
E:B, A, Gtr1, E
F:Atr1, Edifficult
F#:thumb, B, GF, D, Eb+C (use little finger for both)more difficult
G:thumb, A, G, G#E, tr2even more difficult (does not work on all flutes)
Alternative fingerings for fast passages can sometimes be found by simple experiment, but for the 3rd octave it's useful to know that: Quiet 3rd-octave notes are possible (it's an embouchure technique; try tightening the lip muscles a little more), but this works best below the A; after that it's increasingly difficult to play softly without an unacceptable level of "hiss". Leaky pads can make the things worse (have the mechanism adjusted if necessary).

Lilypond fingering diagrams

The GNU/Lilypond music typesetter can produce woodwind fingering diagrams (introduced in version 2.14). These can take up a lot of space between the staves, but if you need the above fingerings as diagrams in Lilypond, here's some Lilypond code and the resulting PDF file.
All material © Silas S. Brown unless otherwise stated.